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Mindful Methods to Curb Holiday Over Indulgence

November 21, 2018

By Meg van Staveren, MPH, RD

Tis’ the season for holiday events! There are lights, laughter, music, and the clinking of dishware and utensils. Let us not forget the aromas of savory and sweet favorites like stuffed turkey, ham, sweet potatoes, casseroles, cakes, cookies, and pies!

The joy we experience celebrating with friends, family, and coworkers is often followed by the agony of feeling stuffed to the gills or bursting at the seams. Holiday celebrations create a sensory overload which can lead us to bypass our natural ability to tap into our true hunger. We find ourselves overfilling our plates and continuing to eat long after our bodies signal we are full.

thanksgiving feast

This year try these simple tips to connect to your body’s senses and eat mindfully:

  1. Stop to consider how hungry you are before you make a plate.
  2. Take only the amount you believe will ease your hunger.
  3. Take small bites and chew slowly to savor the flavor, textures, and aroma.
  4. Put your utensil down between bites.
  5. Pause frequently to notice how your hunger level has changed and stop

Would you like to learn more about how to utilize mindful awareness and apply it to your everyday eating patterns? Check out our Changing from Within course which begins in January!

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